Reverse Sneezing in Dogs Causes Symptoms and Best Treatment

Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Introduction

If you are a dog owner, you may have witnessed your furry friend suddenly gasping for air, making a snorting or honking sound, and exhibiting signs of distress. This behavior is known as reverse sneezing in dogs, and it can be a scary experience for both the pet and the owner. While reverse sneezing is usually harmless, it’s important to understand the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition to ensure your dog’s well-being.

What is Reverse Sneezing in Dogs?

Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Reverse sneezing, also called pharyngeal gag reflex, is a respiratory episode that can occur in dogs of all breeds and ages. It is called “reverse” sneezing because it sounds like a dog is inhaling air forcefully instead of exhaling it. During a reverse sneezing episode, a dog may extend its neck, stand still, and make repeated snorting or honking sounds that can last up to a minute.

Causes of Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Allergies

Dogs can develop allergies to various environmental or food substances that can irritate their respiratory system and cause reverse sneezing. Common allergens include pollen, dust, mold, certain foods, and cleaning products.

Nasal Irritants

Dogs that inhale irritants such as perfumes, smoke, dust, or cleaning products can experience reverse sneezing as a protective reflex to clear their nasal passages.

Excitement or Exercise

Some dogs may exhibit reverse sneezing episodes after engaging in intense physical activity or getting excited, such as meeting a new person or playing with a favorite toy.

Anatomy

Certain dog breeds, such as brachycephalic breeds (e.g., pugs, bulldogs, boxers), have a shortened nasal cavity and an elongated soft palate that can cause breathing difficulties and reverse sneezing episodes.

Infections or Inflammation

In rare cases, reverse sneezing in dogs can be a symptom of an underlying respiratory infection or inflammation, such as kennel cough or nasal tumors.

Symptoms of Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

Reverse sneezing in dogs is usually not a cause for concern and does not require medical attention. However, it’s important to monitor your dog’s behavior during a reverse sneezing episode to rule out any serious underlying conditions. Common symptoms of reverse sneezing in dogs include:

  • Repeated snorting or honking sounds that resemble a goose honking or a pig snorting.
  • Inhaling air forcefully while standing still or extending the neck.
  • Dilated nostrils and a bulging trachea during the episode.
  • Brief episodes that last up to a minute and resolve on their own.

How to Stop Reverse Sneezing in Dogs?

If your dog experiences a reverse sneezing episode, there are several ways to help alleviate the symptoms and prevent future episodes. Here are some tips:

Massage the Throat

Gently massaging your dog’s throat or softly pinching its nose can help stimulate the swallowing reflex and stop the reverse sneezing.

Offer Water

Offering your dog water or a treat can help distract it from reverse sneezing and encourage swallowing.

Remove Irritants

If your dog’s reverse sneezing is triggered by an irritant such as perfume or smoke, removing the irritant from the environment can help prevent future episodes.

Address Underlying Conditions

If your dog’s reverse sneezing is caused by an underlying condition such as allergies or respiratory infection, addressing the underlying cause can help prevent future episodes. This may involve avoiding allergens, changing your dog’s diet, or administering medication prescribed by a veterinarian.

When to Consult a Veterinarian?

While reverse sneezing in dogs is usually not a serious health concern, it’s important to monitor your dog’s behavior and seek veterinary attention if you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • The reverse sneezing episodes become more frequent or prolonged.
  • Your dog exhibits signs of distress, such as restlessness, pacing, or pawing at its nose.
  • Your dog has difficulty breathing or shows signs of respiratory distress, such as gasping for air, wheezing, or coughing.
  • Your dog has other symptoms, such as nasal discharge, lethargy, fever, or loss of appetite.

If your dog is exhibiting any of these symptoms, it’s important to take it to a veterinarian for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Conclusion

Reverse sneezing in dogs can be a frightening experience for both the pet and the owner, but it’s usually a harmless reflex that resolves on its own. However, it’s important to understand the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition to ensure your dog’s well-being. By following the tips and advice outlined in this article, you can help alleviate your dog’s reverse sneezing episodes and prevent future ones. If you have any concerns about your dog’s health or behavior, always consult a veterinarian for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Q: Is reverse sneezing in dogs dangerous?

A: Reverse sneezing is usually harmless and does not pose a serious threat to your dog’s health. However, it’s important to monitor your dog’s behavior and seek veterinary attention if you notice any signs of distress or respiratory problems.

Q: Can reverse sneezing in dogs be prevented?

A: While reverse sneezing in dogs cannot be entirely prevented, you can reduce the frequency of episodes by avoiding allergens, removing irritants from the environment, and addressing underlying conditions that may trigger the episodes.

Q: Is there a cure for reverse sneezing in dogs?

A: Reverse sneezing in dogs is not a medical condition that requires a cure. However, if your dog’s episodes are frequent or prolonged, you may want to consult a veterinarian to rule out any underlying respiratory conditions or allergies.

Q: Can reverse sneezing in dogs be caused by anxiety?

A: While anxiety can trigger certain respiratory conditions in dogs, such as panting or hyperventilation, it’s unlikely to cause reverse sneezing episodes. Reverse sneezing is usually a reflex to clear the nasal passages or throat and is often triggered by environmental factors or physical activity.

Q: Can certain dog breeds be more prone to reverse sneezing?

A: Yes, certain dog breeds, such as brachycephalic breeds (e.g., pugs, bulldogs, boxers), are more prone to respiratory problems, including reverse sneezing, due to their anatomical structure.

Q: Is there any medication for reverse sneezing in dogs?

A: In most cases, medication is not necessary for reverse sneezing in dogs, as it is usually a harmless reflex that resolves on its own. However, if the episodes are frequent or prolonged, a veterinarian may prescribe antihistamines, nasal sprays, or other medications to alleviate the symptoms.

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